Cultivating brand potential

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Deep thinking branding

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding, Marketing,

Thu, 28 Jan 2016

This identity looks intriguing and colourful and certainly draws the eye.

The visual identity is for a philosophy festival in Barcelona and it uses colourful, abstract icons to symbolise its different events.


Barcelona Pensa, which translates to Think Barcelona, is a six-day festival comprised of conferences, talks, workshops and cinema screenings based on topical issues looked at from a philosophical perspective.


Barcelona-based consultancy Studio Carreras has completed the branding for Barcelona Pensa, and has designed 25 different pictogrammes to make up the main visual identity, with more icons designed for additional marketing materials and events.


The shape and colour of the icons are relevant to specific ideas or events. Some of the symbols are quite literal, while others require more thought.


Literal symbols include a black skull (Row 4, Column 4) that has been used to illustrate a talk given on apocalyptic scenarios, and a pink heart (Row 5, Column 1), which also has “sexual connotations”, used for a talk on Socrates’ beliefs in love and eroticism.


The branding was applied to marketing collateral such as posters, flyers and postcards, online and for signage at the festival.



Source: Design Week




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Cosmetic reality

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Advertising,

Wed, 27 Jan 2016

Maybe she’s born with it, maybe it’s Maybelline, or maybe it’s a combination of additional cosmetic products and some Photoshop. This could be my mantra, as whenever I see a cosmetic advert I get frustrated at the fibs that are taking place.

Crystal Ro from BuzzFeed imagined what cosmetic ads would really look like if they only utilized the actual product being marketed.

Each ad has had a variety of extraneous beauty elements removed such as false eyelashes, eye shadow, mascara, blush and more. Makes interesting viewing!


Source: Buzzfeed




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Superhero struggles

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography,

Tue, 26 Jan 2016

Canada-based photographer Daniel Picard LOVES pop culture. He loves it so much, in fact, that he’s created an extensive photo series exploring what some of our favourite superheroes, super villains and pop-culture characters might look like if they lived everyday lives just like ours.

The one of R2D2 falling over a speed bump made me laugh out loud!

The models in most of his photos are drawn from his collectible figure collection. Unlike common action figures, these collectibles can often stand up to the scrutiny of a close-up photo-shoot. Picard then digitally adds them to his final photos. These photos can be found in his Figure Fantasy book, which is available on Amazon.

See more on his website.


Source: Bored Panda




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Losing the pop

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Packaging,

Thu, 21 Jan 2016

The world is a sadder place today: the original creators of Bubble Wrap have introduced ‘iBubble Wrap’: a revamped version of the Bubble Wrap without the pop.

North Carolina-based manufacturer Sealed Air originally created Bubble Wrap. Traditional Bubble Wrap boasts rows of air pockets that are filled individually, while the new alternative features interlinked pockets that will squeeze air into neighbouring pods when pressed, making it more difficult to pop.


The reasoning behind introducing the iBubble Wrap is that the Bubble Wrap takes up too much space, and makes it expensive to ship. The iBubble Wrap is thus designed to be shipped deflated, and then inflated on site. This move is aimed to appeal to space and cost conscious online retailers such as Amazon, which use Bubble Wrap to package materials.



When news of the new product hit the internet, Bubble Wrap lovers took up arms and defended the much-loved product. However, Sealed Air has assured the public that the original Bubble Wrap will not be discontinued, and that the iBubble Wrap was just a cheaper alternative that will soon be available on the market. Phew!

Source: Design Taxi




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Origami art

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Wed, 20 Jan 2016

I love origami, the results look so delicate and beautiful. Although Japan is considered to be the home of origami, Spain has its very own origami master - Gonzalo Garcia Calvo. Some of his designs are so intricate and beautiful that it's hard to believe that they're folded out of only one piece of paper.

Calvo's favorite subject matter seems to be expressive animals, though he has created many other objects as well, including an unbelievable violin. With most of what he has folded, he also credits the other origami artists whose patterns he has used or who have inspired him. For more amazing origami art, be sure to check out his Flickr.

I love Yoda the best!



Source: Bored Panda




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May the fonts be with you

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Marketing, Typography,

Tue, 19 Jan 2016

I can’t believe I have waited this long to write a Star Wars blog!

Apart from the unexpected return of characters like Princess Leia, Han Solo and Chewbacca, the seventh installment of the Star Wars saga, Star Wars: The Force Awakens, unveils the reuse of the ITC Serif Gothic typeface, an iconic element of the original trilogy.



Graphic designer and editor of website FontShop News, Yves Peters, has created a visual guide to the evolution of typography used in the movie posters of the past six episodes, uncovering the vision and inspiration behind each film that influenced the choice in typefaces across promotional materials.



Take a look at the change in typefaces of the movie posters over the years and read the full article here.


Source: Design Taxi




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A great big ‘O’ of a rebrand

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding,

Thu, 14 Jan 2016

I can’t say I’m particularly enthralled by this rebrand. What do you think?

The English National Opera is being rebranded by Rose and is in the early stages of a roll out, which has seen the “singing” O mark retained but slimmed down.


The incumbent logo and its recognisable “ENO” acronym was designed by Mike Dempsey in 1990, when he was at Carroll Dempsey Thirkell.

“ENO” was previously written in three different weights, with the singing “O” the heaviest. The first glimpse of the new brand was revealed as ENO’s Twitter profile picture and shows that each letter is now the same weight.


A spokesman for ENO says that the new brand is being rolled out softly, with a new website launching in January.

Some seasonal campaign work featuring the new identity has also launched and the spokesman says Rose is repositioning ENO as “World-class storytellers”, while reminding the public that all of its operas are in English.

Rose’s work will dovetail with a new front of house at ENO’s London Coliseum Covent Garden location, which is being designed by architect Robin Snell.

I hope to see something more from the marketing collateral and website when they are released which really does show the ENO as “world-class storytellers”.


Source: Design Week




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Top campaigns of 2015

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Marketing, Advertising,

Wed, 13 Jan 2016

Now we are in chilly January it is a good time to look back on the top marketing and advertising campaigns from 2015. Which ones caught your eye?

Coca-Cola radically changed the way it markets its products, introducing a “one brand strategy” where its four product variants – Coca-Cola, Diet Coke, Coca-Cola Zero and Coca-Cola Life – fit underneath the master brand rather than being supported with separate campaigns.


Initial sales figures suggest the shift has paid off. Data from IRI shows that total Coca-Cola value sales across its variants were up in the UK by 1.46% year on year to £480.3m for the 20 weeks to 18 July (the period during which the strategy has been in place).

I thought the Ex Machina fake Tinder date marketing campaign was very clever.  During SXSW festival in Austin this year, various male Tinder users couldn’t believe their luck when they were matched with a beautiful brunette called “Ava” who claimed to be in the nearby area looking for love. Turns out they had been the victims of a marketing stunt to promote artificial intelligence thriller Ex Machina.

One of my favourite brands KitKat decided to double its marketing spend this year to £10m and launched its “Celebrate the breaks” campaign to grab people’s attention.

It started by undertaking its biggest wrapper redesign since the brand came to market almost 80 years ago, changing the logo on more than 100 million packets to reflect the different ways consumers spend their breaks – including one with “YouTube my break” branding.


And this hasn’t been without success – according to IRI data, total Kit Kat sales were £194.0m in the 52 weeks ending 7 November 2015, compared to £186.7m in the previous year, marking an increase of 3.9%.

I’m so pleased this ad campaign is mentioned because I think it is a brilliant advert with a great soundtrack - Sport England – This Girl Can. Sport England’s ‘This Girl Can’ campaign hit the airwaves in January last year, showing real women exercising. The campaign was born out of insight which showed that 75% of women say they would like to exercise more, but refrain from doing so due to a fear of judgement.

The campaign, which was created by FCB Inferno, has also gained industry-wide recognition, winning nine Cannes Lions and Joseph being named ‘Marketer of the year’ at this year’s Masters of Marketing awards.


Read more about the top marketing campaigns in 2015 in this interesting article on Marketing Week


Source: Marketing Week




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Technology addiction

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Illustration,

Tue, 12 Jan 2016

French illustrator Jean Jullien draws witty illustrations that point out our absurd addictions to technology, social media and our smartphones. The artist is famous for mocking our obsession, which cuts us off from the real life, leaving us alienated and lonely. I am definitely the weirdo on the tube – usually reading a book!

Besides his satire, Jullien also uses social networks as a political platform. He is widely known for creating the "Peace for Paris" symbol, which has become a worldwide sign of solidarity with France after the Paris attacks.

To find out more about him, please see his website.


Source: Bored Panda




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Starry night bacteria

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Thu, 07 Jan 2016

A slightly strange art material this – bacteria!

Yet scientists show that they can even recreate Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” with it. They can create various other shapes of surprising sophistication. From depictions of neurons to a map of Manhattan to detailed jellyfish, nothing is impossible if you’re willing to sacrifice legions of microbes for your art.

These almost literally viral art pieces were created for the first international “Agar challenge” with microbiologists competing to grow the best art piece in agar jelly dishes. Agar plates (Petri dishes) are used to grow bacteria cultures. Agar, made from certain algae, provides a jelly that’s indigestible to many organisms, so it provides a stable base for microbe growth.

See more at the ASM website.


Source: Demilked




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Tasty type

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Typography,

Wed, 06 Jan 2016

We love food at Acumen Design, we love typography, so let’s put them together and see what tasty treat we turn up (loving an alliteration there).

Side by Side agency were asked by Sainsbury’s to create some artwork for a “twist your favourites” campaign.

They had six key ingredients to play with, so they created some bespoke typography, which would feature in the campaign’s digital adverts

Each piece was handmade in their studio, and they sourced all of the props and backgrounds from local antique stores. One thing the designers learnt was to not leave chorizo out overnight – apparently mice love it!

Check out the behind the scenes photos below and see more on Side by Side’s website.


Source: My Bored Panda




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Into the wild

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding, Marketing,

Tue, 05 Jan 2016

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) has implemented a new identity and brand as it embarks on a new strategy aimed at conserving the world’s largest wild places in 15 priority regions.

WCS, which is based at the Bronx Zoo in New York, worked with Pentagram on the re-brand to create a design that would powerfully communicate its mission and to help it build a wildlife movement around the globe.


At the same time, the branding had to incorporate the five parks WCS manages – the Bronx Zoo, Central Park Zoo, Prospect Park, Queens Zoo and New York Aquarium – which are visited by 4 million people annually and are an important part of what WCS is all about: many children have their first experience with wildlife at the zoos, setting them on a lifelong course of caring about animals.

The designers first helped the organisation refine its brand strategy with a statement to connect all of its initiatives with the tagline ‘We stand for wildlife’. The new identity visualises this promise with a stylised ‘W’. Made of simple geometry, the mark can project a wide range of expressions, from serious to lively and can appear in linear form or contain different colours and images of animals.

The full-colour version of the symbol appears in five shades of green and blue that reference the land, skies and seas where animals live. Different colours can also be used to represent the various parks and programs. There’s not many visuals yet but I will be interested to see them when they are released.

Source: The Drum




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Idioms illustrated

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Illustration,

Thu, 17 Dec 2015

Literal meaning of sayings and idioms is an artist favourite topic. Here’s the newest serving by Keren Rosen. What happens when you take “rocking chair” or “baking soda” literally? Weird and wonderful illustrations. You’d think that inanimate objects lead more exciting lives than us.

Keren Rosen has been enamoured with drawing since she was 8 years old. She even built wings and tried to fly, but that didn’t pan out well. Therefore, Rosen went to Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem, Israel, where she majored in Industrial Design. After the graduation, she joined Fabrica, the Benetton Research and Communication Center in Treviso, Italy. Nowadays, she both works and draws stuff for the internet.

Check out more on her website.


Source: Demilked




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Barbie girl – not so much

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Advertising,

Wed, 16 Dec 2015

A new Barbie advert is aiming to push beyond traditional gender stereotypes by encouraging girls to imagine themselves in non-traditional roles such as a football coach, vet and museum curator.


The heart-warming piece sees young girls act their chosen professions for real before bemused members of the public in a two-minute clip whilst hidden cameras record the reactions of onlookers.


Explaining the new ad manufacturer Mattel remarked: “For over 56 years, Barbie has inspired imaginations and encouraged girls on their journey to self-discovery. From Mermaid to Movie Star, Pet Vet to Police Officer, Fashionista to Fairy Princess, Barbie continues to celebrate the belief that You Can Be Anything.”


Barbie herself doesn’t make an entrance until the closing scene where a girl is shown playing with the characters dolls in her bedroom. I really like this advert; it is pushing against the Barbie girl stereotype and showing how a brand can alter perceptions of itself. The ad has already come into some criticism, from people who think it’s very ‘cutesy’; so what do you think of it?


Source: The Drum




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Surreal photo manipulations

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography, Digital,

Tue, 15 Dec 2015

The way this photo has been manipulated makes me feel a little bit queasy.


Jati Putra Pratama turns landscape photos into surreal works of art by contorting the scenes to include unusual angles. The Jakarta, Indonesia, graphic designer made waves on Reddit after posting one of his pieces, spawning a flood of copy-cat work, and even a tutorial.


Many online commentators write that Pratama’s work is reminiscent of the physics-defying scenes from the hit-film Inception, but this isn’t Pratama’s only style: his Instagram features more traditional (if there can be such a thing) surreal photos as well. Check them out here.


Source: Bored Panda




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Bio Urns

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Packaging,

Thu, 26 Nov 2015

The creators of Bios Urn see death as a catalyst for new life, and with their eco-friendly product, the remains of a loved one can help fertilise a tree to bring a living organism into the world. Using 100% biodegradable materials, they’ve produced a special capsule that contains a seed, soil, and vermiculite positioned on top of the deceased’s ashes. The urn is filled, components mixed together, closed, and planted.


Bios Urn allows a unique type of mourning. Instead of visiting a tombstone, the grieving can plant the urn and know that it will benefit the Earth by becoming a home for birds and furry creatures. It can also be a place where the living enjoy outdoor activities while shaded by their loved ones. Here, they can create new memories to last the rest of their lifetime.


See more at the Bio Urns website.

Source: My Modern Met




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Flower fossils

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Wed, 25 Nov 2015

In 2012, Rachel Dein showed the owners of a flower-shop a plaster-cast tile she had made from a bouquet. They were impressed, and soon the UK artist began receiving commissions to make more of these modern “fossils.”

It is an interesting process that Dein uses: she presses flowers into wet clay and then pours in a mixture of plaster and concrete to produce a tile. The dry tiles can be left unadorned or be painted.

“I enjoy the magic of plaster casting to create fossils from everyday life,” Dein writes on her website. “Whether it’s a shell found on holiday, your grandmother’s treasured lace, a Christening gown, or the flowers from your wedding.”

You can find more of Dein’s work on her website.


Source: Bored Panda





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Winning wildlife photos

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography,

Tue, 24 Nov 2015

Any excuse for us to feature a great many wonderful photographs. This time it’s the winning images from the 2015 Wildlife Photographer of the Year Contest.

The contest attracted over 42,000 photographs from both professionals and amateurs, so we’re sure that the judges had their work cut out for them!

These visually-stunning images convey a range of emotions. From scenes that are savage to serene to bizarre, the winning photographers capture a incredibly diverse range of shots including: a flock of elegant scarlet ibises taking flight; the grizzly scene of a red fox who captured its prey; and a desolate, sprawling landscape stained with ash.

As winners, these images are all included in an exhibition of the 100 shortlisted photographs, on display at the Natural History Museum in London until April 2016.

Please go to the NHM website to find out about the photographers and their amazing shots and about the exhibition. Congratulations to everyone on such fabulous photos.


Source: My Modern Met




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All in the words

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative, Typography,

Wed, 18 Nov 2015

I love these classic movie posters that are composed of the words from their transcripts.

Created by Glasgow-based artist Robotic Ewe, from afar, they looked like the pixelated versions of the original movie posters, but on a closer look, it reveals the thousands of words that were individually coloured to reflect the larger image.

By cleverly fusing the movie script and the final poster, he sees it as “combining the first creative process of the film with the final process”.

See more on Robotic Ewe’s website.


Source: Design Taxi




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William Morris rebrand

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding,

Tue, 17 Nov 2015

The William Morris Society, which celebrates the work of Arts and Crafts designer William Morris has a new identity.

Pentagram partner Angus Hyland has created the new identity.


The William Morris Society was set up in 1955 and aims to promote the life, work and ideas of Morris, who lived from 1834 to 1896.

The society has its headquarters at Kelmscott House in Hammersmith, west London, where Morris lived for the last 18 years of his life.


It publishes a newsletter, a journal and a website and organises a programme of talks, events and visits throughout the year.

The organisation was looking to rebrand to mark its 50th anniversary.

It also wanted to unify its communications, which had previously featured four different logos with 11 different variations.


For the new identity, Hyland’s team is introducing a single logo made up from a bird emblem and featuring the society’s name.

The emblem is hand-drawn and derived from Morris’s Bird print, which is owned by the society.

The new identity’s colour palette is also inspired by Morris’s work. There is a primary colour palette of red and black and secondary colours have been taken from Morris’s Jasmine print, which is also part of the society’s archive.


I like the way the agency have used Morris’ own work and colour palette to create this new identity; it also unifies all the communications the society produces.


Source: Design Week




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Glittering gems

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Thu, 12 Nov 2015

Suzan Drummen, an artist based in the Netherlands, creates expansive art installations that use thousands of tiny dazzling crystals and other shiny objects to create elaborate mandalas and textile designs.

She doesn’t use a pre-made plan to create these extensive works but rather the specific site she is working on, guides her. Drummen told Irenbrination. “I check the light, the route of the visitors, the colours, the height etc, on spot. The whole atmosphere actually guides me. Every space requires something else and the installation grows slowly.”


Drummen’s goal is to overwhelm the viewer; “From a distance they appear clear and orderly, yet upon closer inspection, the eyes become disoriented by the many details and visual stimuli. That moment, of being able to take it all in or not, is explored, time and time again. The visual perception is challenged, requisitioned and intensified.”


She uses pins to affix the crystal, chrome-plated metal, precious stones, mirrors and optical glass that she uses to walls, but lays these objects down freely on the ground.

I think these look absolutely amazing and I am drawn to them like a magpie to a shiny glass gem. And those large installations – there’s really no words, simply brilliant.


See more of Drummen’s work on her website.


Source: Bored Panda




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Clever packaging design

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Packaging,

Wed, 11 Nov 2015

This Buzzfeed article is an oldie but a goody. It features over 30 innovative and clever packaging designs.

Whether its cord packaging that tears off to become cord ties; portable, on-the-go dog food packaging with a built-in bowl; or the pizza box concept that will change how you eat pizza forever.

Some of this packaging is the best of the best. What’s your favourite?

Source: Buzzfeed





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Beauty in the darkness

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography,

Tue, 10 Nov 2015

These photographs embodies a sense of darkness with a hint of hope aiming to show that there is beauty in everything, even at the bleakest of times. They are the fantastic work of Brooke Shaden who focuses on mystical and surreal photos.

My Modern Met secured an interview with her for a Behind the Lens article so we can not only see her wonderful images but also find out what happens on a shoot.

I love the fairytale and fantasy feel of the images – are there any that speak directly to you?

See Shaden's website for more amazing photos.


Source: My Modern Met




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Take a break

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Marketing,

Thu, 05 Nov 2015

Kit Kat produces some creative and innovative work but we haven’t featured them in the blog for a while. But now they are back with following a recent stunt they carried out in Paraguay.

With the help of agency Nasta, the brand created the ‘Break Machine’, a special vending machine that dispensed chocolate bars to people when they took breaks.

The bench attached to the vending machine detected when they took a break for at least a minute, and they were rewarded with free chocolate for doing nothing.



Source: Design Taxi




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Cartoon bombing

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Illustration,

Tue, 03 Nov 2015

I’ve featured him in our blog before, but Lucas Levitan has created some more funny and cute illustrations.

Levitan is a Brazilian multimedia artist created the fabulous iPhone app Photo Invasion that allows people to add cute and funny cartoon characters into their Instagram pics.

Being an illustrator himself, Lucas also invites people to submit their photos and get them invaded by Lucas.


Source: Bored Panda




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Typography every day

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Typography,

Thu, 29 Oct 2015

Well this sorts out secret Santa for the studio. The Typodarium 2016 is a tear-off calendar that unveils a new typeface every day of the year for your inspiration.

Published by Verlag Hermann Schmidt Mainz, the latest edition of this popular product includes 366 fonts by 223 designers from 32 countries—in addition to information about each featured font, you would also find all the public holidays for these contributing countries in it.


Cheekily described as “totally legal designer drug for people who've got the typography virus”, this would definitely make a great gift for all of your creative friends, who would look forward to their daily “typographical morning greeting”.

This year, the Typodarium is more colourful than ever, and comes packed in a gorgeous box that will look great on any desk.



See their website if you wish to purchase the calendar.


Source: Design Taxi




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Awareness campaign wins awards

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Advertising,

Tue, 27 Oct 2015

This simple but effective print campaign won the top print prize at the Clio Awards.

Created by Ogilvy & Mather London, released the 'It Happens Here’ print and outdoor campaign for the charity, 28 Too Many, in May. The ad explains FGM is an issue that affects people in the UK and across Europe and not just in Africa.


The work, which won two gold Press Lions and a gold Outdoor Lion at Cannes, features European flags that had been shoddily sewn together highlighting that 50,000 girls in the UK are at risk.

Hoden Ali Warsame, an FGM survivor who accepted the award on behalf of 28 Too Many, said: "Previous winners have been huge global organisations like Nike and Google.

"We are a humble UK-based charity who are reliant on volunteers. But we dream big. We want to change the world." 

Well done to the charity and the agency on a brilliant campaign.


Source: Campaign Live




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Panoramic Photos Of Churches

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography,

Wed, 21 Oct 2015

These panoramic photos of churches capture the grandeur of a church in one shot.

Inspired by Pope Francis’ visit to the US, Richard Silver created a series of vertical panoramic photographs. They let you see the beautiful detail of churches from the entrance to the altar.

To see the architecture and beauty of the churches is fantastic but I admit the photos also make me feel a little bit dizzy!

See more of Silver’s work on his website.


Source: Demilked




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Hypnotic 3D sculptures

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Tue, 20 Oct 2015

I love these swirling 3D canvas sculptures. I just want to touch it!

The mesmerizing sculptures are created by partners Stephen Stum and Jason Hallman, collectively known as Stallman. Their newest collection of work, titled Canvas on the Edge, aims to highlight the nature of the materials by giving the impression of movement through the use of elevated structures. Different angles reveal varying perspectives that play with a range of color spectrums reflecting off the ridged canvas.


The Pacific Northwest-based duo create each sculpture in tandem, merging as one to produce something unique. Where one acts as the left side of the brain, the other becomes the right, attempting to dissolve boundaries and form a piece that is completely balanced. The two draw inspiration from the natural world, mimicking biological gradients and cellular patterns within each work.


The canvases remind me of larger versions of quilling and I like the vibrant colours and the swirling textures.


Source: My Modern Met




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First digital art park

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding, Digital,

Thu, 15 Oct 2015

I was interested in this as the project is based in Southend-On-Sea, which is not far from good old Romford where we are based.

The identity has been created for “the world’s first digital art park”, the park will allow visitors to interact with the landscape via a range of apps.

Chalkwell Park in Southend-on-Sea is hosting the NetPark project, organised by national community arts group Metal, which has initially commissioned five artists to create site-specific pieces relating to the social history of the park.

The identity was created by Malcolm Garrett, a British graphic designer, who has worked for music artists such as Simple Minds, Magazine, Duran Duran and Peter Gabriel.


The apps are pitched at a broad audience and have been designed for iPad iPhone and Android, and anyone who doesn’t have access to a device can borrow one from Metal.

Visitors will be immersed in one of five separate stories, which play according to their location in the park.

In addition Metal has joined up with five Southend primary schools on a NetPark education programme. Working with Calvium a Story Building App has been developed, enabling children to develop, write and code locative narratives, written for the park – which are then placed within GPS co-ordinates for other visitors to discover. Each school has worked with a writer and an illustrator.

It all sounds a great, community-based project and I really look forward to visiting the digital art park.


Source: Design Week




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One shot is enough

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Advertising,

Wed, 14 Oct 2015

These striking print ads for UNICEF show how cyber bullying hurts victims.

The ads depict school children with smartphones in hand, ganging up on their helpless targets to capture photos of them.

The accompanying text highlights cyber bullying as the leading cause of depression and suicide among young children, and urges viewers not to use their phones to tear down others’ self-esteem.

Very clever how the bullies look like a firing squad; but the fact we even need this ad campaign makes me sad for modern life.


Source: Design Taxi




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Going down the tube

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography,

Tue, 13 Oct 2015

I remember years of getting on the tube (I’m lucky to work more locally now), but I never experienced them silent and eerie as these photographs show. They remind me of a low budget horror film I once saw called Creep, which gave me the heebie-jeebies!

These empty stations were captured in rare and unique images by New York based photographer Aaron Pegg during a trip to London for his 30th birthday at the start of the month.


Pegg began taking photographs of empty stations in his home city in November 2013 after pictures on Instagram inspired him to pick up a camera himself.


To start, Pegg told the Evening Standard that he was mainly interested in taking pictures of New York City from a landscape and architecture point of view when he entered into the world of photography.


But his camera lens soon turned to photographing empty stations and Pegg has since extended his collection of images with empty London Underground stations. His stunning images have since gained a cult following of more than 147,000 people.


Pegg shot around 500 images across 30 to 40 stations. His pictures show the beauty of the London Underground’s gleaming tunnels and escalators, revealing their symmetry and lines that go unnoticed in the bustle of daily life.



View some images below and follow Pegg on Instagram.


Source: Evening Standard




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Is it ‘Bootiful’?

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding, Packaging,

Wed, 07 Oct 2015

Sometimes rebrands are subtle, but not in this case. Turkey brand Bernard Matthews is set to launch a £3 million rebrand that uses illustration and focuses on Great Witchingham Hall, where Bernard Matthews started the business in 1950.

The new identity has been created by Brandopus and replaces previous branding which was designed by Springetts and launched in 2013.


Springetts also rebranded Bernard Matthews in 2008, when the company was looking to revamp its image following £10 million losses spurred by negative press around Turkey Twizzlers and an outbreak of bird flu at its Suffolk processing plant.


The rebrand also includes a website redesign and a new packaging system, which will see an on-pack colour categorisation introduced. Fresh-coated products will move from clear plastic to full colour sleeves with a window to see the products.

The rebrand will roll out across 100 turkey and chicken SKUs in frozen, fresh breaded and cooked meats ranges.

To launch the brand, Bernard Matthews has also created a virtual reality animation of Great Witchingham Hall, which can be viewed by grocery retailers, in what the brand calls an “industry first”.

Bernard Matthews used Great Witchingham Hall to develop his business, buying the dilapidated building for £3,000 and filling its 35 rooms with turkeys.

I will be interested to see the new packaging and website design when they are rolled out.


Source: Design Week




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The story behind Wingdings

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Typography,

Tue, 06 Oct 2015

The font Wingdings has always fascinated me – it’s a font but it’s made up of symbols – what’s that all about?

Created by Charles Bigelow and Kris Holmes of design studio Bigelow & Holmes, Wingdings was created as a tool for the pre-internet era, providing users with high quality, resizable images that did not take up much space on their hard drives.

In the early '90s, it was one of the first times people realised fonts could break through to the mainstream.


As protégés of legendary designer Hermann Zapf, Bigelow and Holmes drew from Zapf Dingbats and created three fonts—Lucida Icons, Lucida Arrows and Lucida Stars, designed to harmonize with text and similar proportions to Lucida, which they had previously designed. 


The breakthrough came when Microsoft bought the rights to the three fonts in 1990 and combined them into a single font—Wingdings, which was included in a beta test of Windows. The name, Wingdings, combines an old printing term “dingbat” with “Windows”.

As today, Wingdings was occasionally misunderstood. While it was intended to be picked apart, used individually for a splash of imagery, users interpreted it as an unusual font for writing words.


The future of fonts like Wingdings, which occupy a weird space between pictures and text, is impossible to predict. Will emojis become the main means of communication? Will people ditch text altogether?

Read more at Vox to find out more about the history of this surprisingly popular font.


Source: Vox




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Digitalised childhood memories

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Digital, Illustration,

Thu, 01 Oct 2015

These images are inspired by daydreaming and fondest memories and remind me of my own childhood and things I would have liked to do but weren’t possible. They remind me of fairytales and are very whimsical.

These are created by Martina Stipan, who at just 17 years old, is already an experienced digital artist. Some of her works have already been on display in her native Croatia. She says that her passion for digital art started in 2009, when she opened Adobe Photoshop 2.0 for the first time – she uses a lot more programs these days! Stipan’s also studying at a high school for graphical design.

See more of Stipan’s work on Behance.


Source: deMilked




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Torn apart

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Tue, 29 Sep 2015

I find these images somewhat disturbing but also fascinating. These are body-painting subjects created by Chilean artist Jeampiere Dinamarca Poque. Topless models are the usual prey of such artistic savagery, and he paints the women as if they were ripping themselves apart. The image is made more realistic by the white body paint combined with a white background used for the photos.

Jeampiere Dinamarca Poque, who also goes by the name Maicol Jerzon when doing comedy, overcame poverty to become a successful, multifaceted artist. He has a YouTube channel, three released albums, and a line of MP4 players decorated with his graffiti.



See more on his Facebook page.

Source: deMilked




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Scoops of fun

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Marketing, Photography,

Wed, 23 Sep 2015

We recently been looking at creative and strategic concepts and art direction of several household names including Kit Kat and Joe & Seph’s Gourmet Popcorn. So we can relate to what goes on behind the scenes at photoshoots.

‘Behind the Scoops’ is a fun Tumblr blog that shows us behind-the-scenes images of a typical Ben & Jerry’s photoshoot.

Created by the creative team that manages the company’s social media, the blog gives us a glimpse into the creative direction of the brand.



Check out the blog here. See our Facebook page to see images of the photo shoot concepts being mocked up.


Source: Design Taxi




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Tiny hyperrealism

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Illustration,

Tue, 22 Sep 2015

These striking monochromatic images are no larger than a pen. Created by Swedish student and artist Johanna (aka @jackdevilart), the illustrations are most next to simple tools for scaling purposes – you may not realise just how tiny they are – as well as incredibly detailed and precise.


A mixture of fine-tipped pens and freshly sharpened pencils help Johanna create the small marks and subtle shading needed to bring her miniscule subjects to life. Although mostly drawn in a realistic style, she’s not afraid to mix techniques, either. Johanna often incorporates bold silhouettes for a dramatic flair, catching your eye and immediately commanding your attention.


Source: My Modern Met




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Attention grabbing

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Advertising,

Wed, 16 Sep 2015

For advertisers it gets harder and harder to gain potential customers’ attention so the good folks at Creative Bloq have put together 35 must see examples of billboard advertising. See some below or head over to Creative Bloq to see more. Which ones do you think are particularly effective?










Source: Creative Bloq




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Political branding

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding,

Tue, 15 Sep 2015

Very interesting article on Design Week website about the rise of political branding. Obviously political parties have had their own branding and marketing for many years now but UK politicians have started copying their USA counterparts and we are seeing more personal identities.

Front-running Labour candidate Jeremy Corbyn has been making his case for party leadership in recent weeks through a campaign fronted by this logo and using the strapline “straight talking honest politics”.


Social media has become increasingly more important in political campaigns with the Corbyn camp echoing Barack Obama’s #yeswecan presidential election campaign of 2008 with his #jezwecan message.

Recently we’ve also seen graphic design used as a tool for political jousting in the US as the teams of Democrat candidate Hilary Clinton and Republican candidate Jeb Bush manipulated each others messages and logos in a rather public Twitter spat.


So what does make a good political candidate logo today? Read the Design Week article to get the experts views. But what would attract you to vote for them?


Source: Design Week




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Chemically altered

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography,

Thu, 10 Sep 2015

These are very disturbing photographs on an important and concerning topic. Brandon Seidler draws attention to the damage humans have done to the environment by photographing natural landscapes that have been altered by chemical pollution and then soaking the film in the same harsh chemicals that were found at the site.

The developed film, which has been corroded by different acids, yields distorted, uncanny images of a world transformed by manmade toxins.


Seidler from New Jersey, was a college senior when he found a way to treat film using chemicals, producing extremely colorful results in the process. Later, he came up with the idea of pairing chemically altered film with the environmental issues he was so passionate about.


Although some of the pollutants can be removed from the site of a toxic spill, Seidler doubts whether the damage can ever be completely reversed. "What happens to the initial amount absorbed into the ground? Or by the plants or animals that are there at the spill site?" he questions. "If this is the effect they have on a piece of plastic, what is it doing to our environment?"


He is hoping to turn his photos into a photo book called ‘Impure’ and recently launched a Kickstarter campaign. See his website for more photos and information.


Source: My Modern Met




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Type good enough to eat

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Typography,

Wed, 09 Sep 2015

Utah-based letterer, typographic illustrator, and graphic designer Becca Clason has created a set of gorgeous typography words using everyday pantry items, such as sugar, salads or seeds.

Merging craft, creativity, and humour, Clason pays attention to details and aesthetic of her gourmet messages.


Type that really is good enough to eat – what’s your favourite? I like how the ingredients compliment the word that is designed – I think ‘fresh’ is my favourite.


Source: Design Taxi




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Pure magnetism

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Digital,

Tue, 08 Sep 2015

This clock relies on the manipulation of magnetic fluids to display the time. I find it mesmerising and rather beautiful. Created by Zelf Koelman of the Eindhoven University of Technology, the clock is known as the Ferrolic.


"A few years ago I fell in love with the magical characteristics of a little black 'blob' in a bottle," Koelman explains "One could manipulate the position and shape of a floating drop of Ferro Fluid with a magnet. The dynamics and shape of this liquid body was much like a living entity. I decided to allow this entity to live its own life and have a function. A year of research and engineering eventually resulted in Ferrolic."


Not only is Ferrolic able to tell time, it's also customisable. Users can display text, shapes, and transitions by operating a web app that transmits information to the clock. This transforms the device into a tabletop piece of art that one can display around the house. Only 24 of these fascinating clocks have been made thus far, but the Ferrolic team has hinted that the appliance may become more accessible in the future.


Read and see more on the Ferrolic's website.


Source: My Modern Met




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Coffee monster

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Illustration,

Thu, 03 Sep 2015

I love these cute, fun coffee stain monsters created by Stefan Kuhnigk.

Kuhnigk, a copywriter, once spilled a cup of coffee and within that dark espresso stain he saw a monster staring back and so he drew him. And he hasn’t looked back since, so far drawing more than 480 coffee-monsters. Since then he has used better paper and cool tools to make the monsters and writes little stories to make them even more interesting and amusing.

Kuhnigk says: “It never gets old for me, because a spill is never the same. The coffeemonsters are my way of expressing my love for comics, coffee and randomness.”

Check out more coffee monsters at the website. All that coffee used – the coffee industry must love him.


Source: Bored Panda




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Rebrand aims to add consistency

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding, Marketing,

Tue, 01 Sep 2015

London Metropolitan University is launching a new identity, as it seeks to strengthen its brand and create consistency.


The previous identity launched in 2002, when London Metropolitan University was formed from a merger between London Guildhall University and the University of North London.


Creative agency Turnbull Grey has been working on the new identity for around six months, alongside the university’s marketing team.


London Metropolitan University had been using several sub-brand identities, including branding for The Cass, which the university says “is no longer used on anything new”.


Turnbull Grey says it looked to develop a “clear structure and pathway for application hierarchy” and also to “connect the faculties absolutely to the parent brand.”


To do this, the consultancy says it has aimed to create consistency across all applications and has developed a set of online guidelines for staff, students and designers as well as a set of templates for staff and external consultancies.


What do you think of the new identity?


Source: Design Week




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Tiny tears

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography,

Thu, 27 Aug 2015

This is a fascinating photography series, which reveals what tears look like when placed under a microscope.

Proving that not all tears are alike, Maurice Mikkers showcases their beautiful varieties under a microscope. The Dutch photographer gathered his friends and spent an evening experimenting, asking them to come over and “pick a way they would like to cry.” Participants could choose from cutting onions, eating hot peppers, looking into a fan, or from emotion (like happiness and sadness). Mikkers then captured every shed tear with a micropipette and dispensed them on a slide. The results are a remarkable look at the scientific structure of crying.


There are three basic types of tears—basal, reflex, and psychic. Basal tears keep the eye lubricated, while reflex tears are triggered by irritants such as allergies. Psychic tears, which are perhaps the most well known, relate to profound emotion, like when you cry during a sad film. They’re all composed of ingredients like oils, antibodies, and enzymes that are suspended in salt water. – I’m learning so much today!


Mikkers’s photographs reveal a visual distinction between the types of tears. Cutting an onion yields a different result than what’s produced by laughter or grief - their crystallized arrangements vary in density and pattern.


They look like delicate snowflakes.

See and read more at Mikker’s website, see also his project on the Crystalline formations of hard drugs, which is extremely interesting.


Source: My Modern Met




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The More You Connect, The Less You Connect

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Advertising,

Mon, 24 Aug 2015

I’m not keen on society’s on going love of technology, in particular smart phones. I do not appreciate photos of your dinner (which always look revolting – you are not a food photographer) and pouty selfies make you look like narcissist idiots.

So I really understand this series of ads from the Shenyang Center for Psychological Research, which highlight the detrimental effects smartphones can have on human relationships.


The three ads show typical home-life situations, with an oversized smartphone in the middle blocking any conversation between the two people in the image.


The adverts were created by Shiyang He, a designer in advertising agency Ogilvy’s Beijing office.


The caption at the bottom of the image reads “The More You Connect, The Less You Connect” – do you agree?

Shiyang He is definitely a designer to watch at the moment as he also produced the bottom series of ads tackling issues of pregnancy and transport and has won numerous accolades for his work.


Check out more of his work on his Behance portfolio.

Source: Bored Panda, Demilked




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Minimalist packaging

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Charity, Packaging,

Thu, 20 Aug 2015

This is an ingenious packaging concept for WWF (World Wild Fund for Nature), which shows what you can do without plastic packaging.


Created Leo Burnett, a creative agency based in Sydney, Australia, This minimalist packaging design consists of 100% natural and biodegradable paper cartons, with a logo and minimal copy printed on them with black ink.

There is a cutout window in the shapes of plastic bottles that are typically used to contain household products like glass cleaner and mouthwash.


Each of these cartons are packed with fresh produce, such as lemons, grapefruit and cinnamon, which are all natural alternatives that can do the same jobs as the chemical products packaged in plastic bottles.


The objective of the campaign is to show how there is an option to switch to more sustainable products in our day-to-day lives—more importantly, it aims to illustrate how plastic packaging is not only harmful to our environment, but also unnecessary. 



Find out more about this brilliant concept here.

Source: Design Taxi




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Tattoo typography

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Typography,

Wed, 19 Aug 2015

The popular '36 Days of Type’ project is still ongoing and this vintage tattoo typography stands out as an excellent example of this.



Created by CaliDoso an illustrator and lettering artist, this attractive typography is influenced by vintage tattoo styles.


Using a combination of basic drawing tools and modern design software, CaliDoso skillfully applies the distinct aesthetic of traditional tattoos to typography, adding attractive colors to each artwork to form a wonderfully detailed, illustration-based set of letters and numbers.


See more of the collection here.

Source: Design Taxi




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Paper portraits

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Tue, 18 Aug 2015

I can’t believe the detail and skill that has gone into creating these amazing paper portraits.

Using an X-acto knife and tweezers, Korean artist Yoo Hyun hand carves intricate cut-paper portraits that feature the likes of movie stars, world leaders, and musicians.


Up close, Hyun’s pieces look like abstract designs, but from afar they read as photo-realistic depictions of his subjects. He achieves this by incorporating a zigzag pattern into his compositions, where each line is specially cut to build a three dimensional-looking form.


Once a portrait is done, its negative space is see-through. That means Hyun can layer his handiwork onto any surface or pattern, making the same piece look radically different, depending on its backdrop. A black ink-splattered background is a popular choice, but sometimes Hyun goes for bold colors and illuminates the portraits in blue and red.


You can find Hyun’s cut outs, works in progress, and inspirations on his Instagram, @yoo.hyun. If you want to see close-up detail shots of his pieces, check out his @yoohyun_artist account. There, his artwork is blown up and tiled, one piece over many photos, allowing you to examine each section of his work.


Source: My Modern Met




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In a child’s eye

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Charity, Illustration,

Thu, 06 Aug 2015

Sheffield Children’s Hospital’s eye department has been decorated with illustrations that can also be used in clinical eye examinations.

Graphic designer and illustrator Nick Deakin has worked with arts programme Artfelt to illustrate 14 rooms in the department.


Artfelt is run by the hospital’s charity organisation, The Children’s Hospital Charity. The group enables the creation of artwork in the hospital, which aims to engage and distract young patients.

The illustrations include a series of “characters” composed from simple shapes. They undertake a “journey” from the walls of the waiting room around the whole department, which young patients can follow, Deakin says.


He has based his character illustrations on shapes that can be used as focus points in eye tests, while also turning the department into a “bright, airy and welcoming space”, says the charity.

The artwork features in the waiting room, six orthoptics rooms, four consulting rooms, a treatment room, a quiet room and a visual fields room. The illustrations have incorporated different “themes” for each room, including beach, space, farm and park.


Illustrations feature on the ceilings within treatment room to help provide a “distraction” for children when receiving eye drops, and on the walls of orthoptic rooms to provide patients with images to focus on during eye exams.

They have also been printed onto acetate sheets and can be projected onto walls in the waiting room, enabling the illustrations to be changed which “keeps the artwork fresh”, the charity says.


The illustrations were printed by Sheffield-based company Signs Express on colour cut vinyl.

Deakin, alongside Artfelt, hopes to expand the illustrations into a range of merchandise, which will be sold to raise money for the Children Hospital’s Charity.



Source: Design Week




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Should brands be our friends?

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding, Digital,

Wed, 05 Aug 2015

Do you have certain brands that you follow on social media? I have the odd few that I support, usually charities but sometimes services or products.  I may ‘like’ or comment on a few posts, sometimes favourite or retweet things that I think are interesting, important or amusing.


What I don’t like though is when brands try to talk to me like they are a person, I find it rather odd, they are not my friends I am their customer or potential client, not someone they go down the pub with.

So I found this article on Campaign Live suitably interesting: where brands are encouraged to ditch what the journalist and blogger Tshepo Mokoena this month called brand’s "faux chummy behaviour".  Is it time to go back to the crisp and clear advertising messages?


What started out with Innocent in 1999 has now gathered momentum with most customer brands trying to be your mate. So is Mokoena right when she says "Let’s get back to the good old days when you could tell your real friends were the ones not trying to sell you stuff"?
Read the article here and find out what other marketers think.


Source: Campaign Live




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Let’s work for wildlife

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Charity, Branding, Marketing,

Tue, 04 Aug 2015

As a family we love visiting London Zoo, not so keen on the queues and the prices but I did always quite like their black and white identity so I look at their new branding with interest.

The Chase has rebranded the Zoological Society London’s family of brands, which includes charity arm ZSL, ZSL London Zoo and ZSL Whipsnade Zoo.


The consultancy started working on brand architecture in January 2014 before the project grew into a full rebrand.

ZSL is the master brand, with ZSL London Zoo and ZSL Whipsnade Zoo sitting beneath these. Each of the three brands has been clarified, with the ZSL brand given more prominence and the new positioning “Let’s Work for Wildlife”. This replaces the previous strapline “Living for Conservation”.

It is hoped the new branding would help the two zoos forge a better connection with the ZSL brand so the public can understand the value of the conservation work.


The new brand is also about fun and natural beauty.

A new colour palette has been created and features 12 new colours such as tiger orange, otter brown and turtle green. I really like how all the colours are named after animals or habitats.


The branding is rolling out now across touchpoints including signage around the London Zoo and Whipsnade Zoo sites.


What do you think of the new branding? I can see how it brings all the brands together and makes them seem more connected. I can’t help but think the positioning, colours and overall brand seems quite childlike which is fine for the posters that are advertising events but seems to go against the more serious message of the conservation work ZSL do. What do you think?


Source: Design Week





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Neat freak

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative, Photography,

Thu, 30 Jul 2015

I’m a bit of a neat freak; I like things clean, organised and tidy. So I totally get these photographs of everyday objects unified in theme and colour.

These perfectly neat colour gradient arrangements are created by Emily Blincoe, from Austin, Texas. While her brother had tried to teach her photography, her real love for the subject blossomed when she got her first digital point-and-shoot. Satisfied with the instant gratification of digital photography, she finally felt ready for a DSLR camera in 2009.

In Blincoe's skilled hands, even the most ordinary material can be turned into a work of art. Commonplace objects like leaves, cereal, and stones are meticulously laid out in orderly, geometric displays that show off a smooth gradient of hues. Aesthetically pleasing to the highest degree!

Do you have a favourite?


To see more of Blincoe’s work please check out her website.

Source: Demilked




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Life-like illustration portraits

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Illustration,

Thu, 23 Jul 2015

Often when one thinks of illustrations, a fun, cartoony style springs to mind. These beautiful life-like portraits are very far from that image.

Created by Davide Morettini, an Italian illustrator, this series of realistic watercolour portraits shows the attractive side profiles of famous Hollywood female stars.

These life-like paintings feature the glamorous faces of well-known actresses like Natalie Portman, Angelina Jolie and Nicole Kidman.

Have a look at Morettini’s Behance page to see more portraits and behind the scenes and the making of photographs.


Source: Design Taxi




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How exotic

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Wed, 22 Jul 2015

Apparently these are paintings – absolutely no way, its definitely a photo, I do not believe it is an actual painting, nope…

… But amazingly it is. These are incredibly hyper realistic depictions of exotic cacti blooming across enormous canvases.

Created by Korean artist Kwang-Ho Lee, the paintings measure up to 8 feet tall. The detailing is breath taking with hairy surfaces, feathery blossoms, and tiny bristles creating a texture to the paintings.

As one of South Korea's most eminent realist artists, Lee has exhibited his work prominently over the last 15 years. Many of his paintings are displayed in the nation's most prestigious art institutions, including the National Museum of Contemporary Art, the Seoul Museum of Art, and the Gyeonggi Museum of Modern Art.

I’m still struggling to believe they are paintings though!


Source: My Modern Met




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Dyslexic Typeface

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Typography,

Tue, 21 Jul 2015

Many of us take for granted how easy it is for us to read and write; but people all over the world struggle with reading for a variety of reasons including dyslexia. So Daniel Britton created the “Dyslexic Typeface” for a self-incited project whilst at University at The London College of Communication.

As a dyslexic himself, Britton knew that existing material explaining the condition was rather basic. He wanted to be able to demonstrate the feeling of reading with dyslexia. So, he created a typeface that would be almost illegible so that it would slow down the reading pace of a non-dyslexic person to the speed of a dyslexic and in return recreating the frustration, the embarrassment of reading with the condition.

Now his Dyslexic Typeface is gaining more media attention, Britton has created Dyslexia Awareness educational pack to send out to schools on request that will educate the parents and the teachers on what the issue is and how best to treat it.


See his website for more information.

Source: Bored Panda




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Have a heart or a shank

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Charity, Marketing, Advertising,

Thu, 16 Jul 2015

Sex sells – that’s the phrase isn’t it? Well, rather attractive naked or scantily clad ladies (rather than men) are well known to be overused in advertising to sell various products and services.

PETA are no exception to this rule and are infamous for their close to the edge marketing. In 2010 they featured Pamela Anderson in a bikini to try and get people to ditch meat. The organization published an ad featuring former Victoria’s Secret model and Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition cover girl Marisa Miller posing unclothed in a bathtub to protest cruelty against Orca Whales.


Now France-based lingerie designer Zahia Dehar has stripped bare to star in PETA’s most recent ad calling for more people to go vegetarian.

The image was captured by musician and photographer Bryan Adams.


Zahia commented on the PETA UK website, “Humans allow themselves not just to kill animals but also to kill them in more and more atrocious ways. And all of this just for their own pleasure, for their personal satisfaction… This has always disgusted me, because I’ve always been on the animals’ side. So if, like me, you don’t want animals to be abused, tortured or killed, please follow my example and switch to vegetarian meals.”


As thought provoking and attention grabber as this poster is – would it persuade you to ditch the meat?

See PETA’s website for more information about their campaigns.

Source: Design Taxi




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Powerful but elegant

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography,

Tue, 14 Jul 2015

Studio dance photographer Alexander Yakovlev creates stunning portraits of professional dancers that are brought to life with the use of airborne flour. Yakovlev doesn't only utilize this powdery element to make his images pop, he has also created a portfolio that allows black and white to meet colour, ballet to meet break dance, and stationary poses to meet energetic, mid-air freeze frames. In embracing these differing components of his work, the photographer is also embracing the various forms of dance itself.


In each photo, dancers are shown in poses that reflect the elegance of their bodily movements. The use of flour helps to enhance this feature by enabling each position to stand out and to demonstrate the beauty of both dance and the powerful human body. This is especially apparent in the portrait "Big Bang Theory," which perfectly represents the passionate nature of Yakovlev's captivating work.


To see more of Yakovlev’s work please see his website.

Source: My Modern Met




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Breast Cancer Now

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Charity, Branding, Marketing, Digital,

Wed, 08 Jul 2015

I saw the first TV advert for Breast Cancer Now just the other day and it intrigued me enough to look up the branding. Luckily Design Week had a feature on it.

Breast Cancer Now is a new organisation formed from a merger between Breakthrough Breast Cancer and Breast Cancer Campaign.


The Clearing has created the identity for the new charity and the Creative Director Jonathan Hubbard says that part of the brief for the new identity was to create “the first major new charity brand of the 21st century”.

The newly formed organisation is the largest breast cancer charity in the UK and is launching with the aim of stopping women dying from breast cancer by 2050.


The previous Breakthrough Breast Cancer identity was created by Hat-trick in 2009, while the Breast Cancer Campaign branding was developed in 2013 by Vincent Design and Identica’s Chris Cleaver.

The new Breast Cancer Now identity uses a pink and grey colour palette, while the logo features a heart inside a circle.


Hubbard said: “The pink was a challenge for us. Breast cancer charities effectively own pink and there are 53 charities in the sector, many of whom are using the colour.

“But we wanted to own the cause of stopping breast cancer. If we didn’t use pink in the identity then the charity would have to spend the first ten minutes of every conversation explaining why they weren’t pink.”

I think this is always an interesting problem for designers and charities, and even particular industries.


A softer, more natural pink was used rather than the magenta used by similar charities. This is teamed with a harsher grey, so that the charity can talk about hope and fear.

Rather than having strict brand guidelines like other charities, the identity has been designed “as a symbol that people could treat as their own.” Charity supporters will be able to use the identity in any way they wish without harsh boundaries.


What do you think? Is this the first major new charity brand of the 21st Century?


Source: Design Week




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Finger lickin’ tray

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Digital,

Tue, 07 Jul 2015

Fast food chain KFC knows that its chicken is “finger lickin’ good”, but using your smartphone while eating will most likely leave an oily fingerprint on your touchscreen.

To prevent this mishap from happening, the brand invented the ‘Tray Typer’—a durable paper tray that doubles as a rechargeable, wireless keyboard for your smartphone.

Connected via Bluetooth, the Tray Typer lets you to use your smartphone—without getting it dirty—while enjoying a KFC meal.

See the video of it in action

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Source: Design Taxi




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Untranslatable words explained

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Illustration,

Wed, 01 Jul 2015

I love a bit of international design and learning words in other languages – but sometimes words just can’t be translated effectively. Luckily Marija Tiurina has collected, explained, and illustrated 14 non-English words should you every want to use them. I like it when my son gently runs his tiny fingers through my hair, there is a word for that: cafune. I have already definitely dealt with some people who would be described as kyoikumama – a mother who relentlessly pushes her children towards academic achievement.

Marija Tiurina is a London based artist with a vibrant, somewhat cartoony style. According to translation methodology, what Ms. Tiurina did with “Untranslatable Words” is “paraphrasing”, when an untranslatable word is replaced with an explanation. However, for English, “loanwords” are the usual way to go about it – that’s how we got words like “commando”.

See more of Tiurina’s illustrations on her website.


Source: Demilked




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LEGO minifigures fun

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Tue, 30 Jun 2015

A blog is not complete without it mentioning LEGO at least every two months!

And if it includes Star Wars, Marvel and DC Comics we are definitely sorted.

French photographer Samsofy Pardugato has created an adorable photo series of LEGO minifigures caught in humorous situations.

Combining his photography skills with techniques of street art, model making and art installations, he brings the minifigures to life by creating witty scenes using everyday items, and objects he has found on the streets.

See more at his website.


Source: Design Taxi




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Children trapped in high fashion prisons

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Advertising,

Wed, 24 Jun 2015

These striking print ads are extremely clever. At first glance they look like normal high fashion spreads. But then you see the small child’s face peeking out from between the stripes, which then begin to look very much like a prison.

Each ad is also accompanied with a tagline serving as a reminder that the piece of clothing “shouldn’t cost a childhood.”

Created by Lew'LaraTBWA for the Abrinq Foundation - an organization for children’s rights - in affiliation with Save the Children, this campaign roped in models and top fashion photographers to shoot the ads.

A ‘#Dress4Good’ hashtag is also created, aiming to encourage individuals to upload “positive fashion-forward images” to their Instagram accounts.

The agency clarified that this campaign is not meant to lampoon the fashion industry, but to raise awareness that “child labor crimes are closer to the consumer than they might think.”


Source: Design Taxi




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Designing “with and not for” people with autism

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding, Digital,

Tue, 23 Jun 2015

This is an interesting project, which has produced some excellent design. Blue State Digital has co-designed Ambitious About Autism’s new website by working directly with young people who have Autism.

Ambitious About Autism is a charity which offers education and support, raises awareness and is involved in campaigning and lobbying.


BSD has designed the site “with and not for” young people with autism and has looked to “not just tick the accessibility box” but “fully embrace all users”. Ambitious About Autism is descripted as a “disruptive brand”, which is looking to enact change and offer support.

The previous site engaged a small active community, but a need was identified to drive further, broader engagement and increase fundraising.


The consultancy has taken an “action-orientated approach”, which means encouraging people who use the site to take increasing levels of action and to become more involved.

One of the key sections of the site is My Voice, a forum section co-designed with and directed towards young people. Parents have also been engaged. My voice will be “an authoritative voice”.


A strong voice will be garnered through structured debate, led by stakeholders and by including the voices of the charity’s Young Patrons –who attend party conferences, meet MPs and campaign.

A new topic-based “About autism” section has been created and is geared to accessing information quickly. It also integrates with the forums.

View the new website here.

Source: Design Week




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Birds of a feather

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography,

Thu, 18 Jun 2015

In this series titled Birds, fashion photographer Thomas Lohr shows off birds’ amazing plumage. He focuses on tightly cropped, up-close shots of feathers, and he captures a variety of colors, textures, and movements within the illustrious tufts.

In some of Lohr’s photographs, it’s even unclear that we’re looking at a bird. His vantage point abstracts the feathers and they seem to resemble scales or long strands of fur. Other times, the delicate layers of quills and vanes unmistakingly belong to a bird.

Lohr did some traveling for this series, and it’s now a book of the same name. He only wanted to capture portraits of living birds, so he visited different parks and menageries all over Europe. The results are photos that highlight the vast elegance of these beautiful animals.

The photographs are wonderful and though I recognise the plumage of several birds I would really like to know what they all are!

See more at Lohr’s website.


Source: My Modern Met




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Typeface influence

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Typography,

Wed, 17 Jun 2015

I’m always fascinated in how psychology and marketing overlap, it is why I’m interested in colour of logos. So this experiment, run by critically acclaimed filmmaker and author Errol Morris in 2013 was worth sharing. Morris got readers of The New York Times to take an online test. The test aimed to find out if the typeface a statement is written in would have any impact on a reader’s willingness to agree with that statement. Simply put, are some typefaces more believable than others?

The results show that 250-year-old serif, Baskerville, was statistically more likely to influence the minds of readers when compared to Computer Modern, Georgia, Helvetica, Comic Sans and Trebuchet. The results of his experiment is published in a monograph called ‘Hear, All Ye People; Hearken, O Earth!’ printed by design firm Pentagram.

Pentagram partner and long-time Morris collaborator Michael Bierut put together the typographically exquisite monograph, with the help of designer Jessica Svendsen.

You can find out more about the experiment and read an interview with Errol Morris here.


Source: Design Taxi




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Cube food

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative, Marketing,

Tue, 16 Jun 2015

Dutch artists Lernert and Sander cut raw food into 98 perfect 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 cm cubes, creating a tantalizing geometric display. This viral photo was commissioned by Dutch newspaper de Volkskrant for their food-themed documentary photography special.

The two artists started collaborating on art-related projects in 2007, and their first film together explores different ways to melt a chocolate bunny.

See more of their work on their website.

I love the symmetry, the precision and the colours!


Source: Bored Panda




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Everyday objects sketches

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Illustration,

Thu, 11 Jun 2015

These clever illustrations use everyday objects and then add a sense of fun, depth and whimsical perspective.

Christoph Niemann, from New York, can take a pair of scissors and make them into a woman reading a newspaper; he can transform a comb into a fancy Rolls Royce; and a fork into a giraffe eating a tree shoot.

Niemann is renowned for his simple, quirky style that includes surprising details. His paintings, cartoons and sketches have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker Magazine, Time and Wired, among others. Follow him on Instagram to catch more of his delightful cartoons. Or see his website.


Source: My Modern Met




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Instagram account for book lovers

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Digital,

Wed, 10 Jun 2015

I read books – not tablets, not ebooks – actual proper books.  I even go to our local library to get books out as well as frequenting Waterstones. When I got the train the other day, I was quite sad to see most of the people on carriage fiddling with their phones or pumping music into their ears. Only two of us were reading books.


So I think this Instagram account may be for me! 21-year-old Slovakian and self-described “supporter of reading books” Jakub Pavlovsky is seeking to change our gadget-obsessed society, one book at a time.


Pavlovsky has an initiative called ‘BOOK’S CALLING’ that aims to show the beauty of getting lost in the stories of physical books. 


He captures portraits of himself reading while sitting in the same pose in each photograph and pairs them with quotes by authors, which he documents on Instagram

Pavlovsky wants to show people that it’s possible to “Make Time For Reading. Anywhere, Anytime”.


Check out the Instagram page.


Source: Design Taxi




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Silver peacock

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Tue, 09 Jun 2015

Peacocks aren’t terribly metal, but this university student made one worthy of a rock album cover. And I think it looks incredible beautiful, despite the facts it is made from spoons!

Going by “liddlenomnom” on reddit, the sculptor is from Northern Michigan University and made the metal peacock as her final project, spending over 120 hours in total.

Spoons, 1300 feet of wire, a portable vegetable steamer, and a gravy boat were all used in the process. The result is a bird that weighs 23 pounds, with a whopping 9 pounds just for the tail. The tail is so heavy that it has to be attached to the pedestal and not the bird. Since most of the metal was found, the sculpture cost just $50 to make.

Liddlenomnom is now planning to show the peacock at the ArtPrize exhibition, after which she might sell the bird. $3000 is her ballpark estimate after all the time, material and workshop hours are accounted for.

See the full process at Liddlenomnom’s imgur page.


Source: Demilked




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Roll with it

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding, Packaging,

Thu, 04 Jun 2015

Cadbury Mini Rolls is refreshing its branding and packaging to bring it into line with the “joy” positioning recently introduced by parent company Cadbury.

Robot Food has created new designs for the cake brand. The agency was tasked with making the Mini Rolls brand more modern, relevant and in keeping with the Cadbury masterbrand.The project follows Pearlfisher’s 2013 rebrand of Cadbury Dairy Milk.

Just goes to show that no matter how big (or small) a business is, consistency is always important.

The redesign sees the new strapline “with BIG personality” added, while each flavour has been given its own individual slogan.

I did feel the old packaging was getting a bit tired and dull, this is a big improvement, like the splash of colour and fun copy and it will appeal to kids and adults alike. I also like the use of the swirl icon. I also kind of want one, like right now….


Source: Design Week




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Just like his dad

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Advertising,

Wed, 03 Jun 2015

These powerful posters show how domestic violence can be a generational problem.

FCB Auckland has created hard-hitting outdoor posters that reveal how it perpetuates itself in a vicious, never-ending cycle.

Created for New Zealand charity Shine, the street ads bear sentences that show how children grow up to be like their abusive parents.

According to statistics, nearly 85% of abusers are a victim of domestic violence themselves.

Think you would call these simple, but effective.


Source: Design Taxi




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Tokyo through a magnifying glass

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography,

Tue, 02 Jun 2015

I love these series of photographs called ‘Glassporthole’, it features a diffused and blurry view of the city of Tokyo where the buildings, streets, and signage are fused into a dazzling mixture of color, light, and shape.

Created by Japanese photographer Takashi Kitajima, as well as the abstract images, Kitajima uses a magnifying glass to bring the photo into a tight focus and show a miniaturized version of the landscape.

The two techniques are clever on their own but the was Kitajima combines them makes for unique images.

Having the word “porthole” in the series title also conjures ideas of a tiny porthole window you’d find on a ship that provides a glimpse to the larger outside.

I really like the ones that look like bobbing lights – do you have a favourite?


Source: My Modern Met




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Behind the iconic brands

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding,

Thu, 28 May 2015

Interesting article on highsnobiety.com that looks at 10 iconic brands and investigates the stories behind their brand slogan.


Such as the California Milk Processor Board’s “got milk” slogan, which came from a woman saying at a focus group: “The only time I even think about milk is when I run out of it.’ So ‘got milk?’ was scrawled on a poster board for a meeting and it was then decided it might be a tagline.


Other brands covered are Apple and their slogan ‘Think Different’; BMW and their slogan ‘the ultimate driving machine’; and the City of Las Vegas: ‘what happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas”.


If you like a bit of brand history this is the article for you.


Read the full article here, the article also contains a link to the curious and questionable origins of Nike’s iconic slogan “Just Do It”, makes fascinating reading.

Source: Highsnobiety.com




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Overdevelopment, overpopulation, overshoot

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography,

Tue, 26 May 2015

An environmental NGO, Global Population Speak Out, has produced a photo book documenting the problems the population boom is causing Earth.


More people mean more consumption, more trash and more pollution. and has to be prepared for farming and resource extraction, clearing away forests and nature. Trash famously finds its way out of the overflowing garbage collection dumps and into nature. And, of course, the infrastructure supporting our lives can have it‘s own accidents, like oilrig fires and oil spills, and rivers polluted with factory run-off.


Global Population Speak Out strives to spread awareness about the issues arising from overpopulation and consumerism. Their leading suggestions include emancipation of women, as well as wider access to education – both measures that would lead to falling birthrates. General activism and awareness rising is important, too, to bring the message to those who do not know about the world‘s problems.


The photo book is called “Overdevelopment, Overpopulation, Overshoot”. You can find out more about the NGO here. The photos are creative and interesting to see a different way of getting a point across.


Source: Demilked




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Feeling the force

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Marketing,

Thu, 21 May 2015

Another month, another LEGO blog, sorry can’t help myself; I’m feeling the force of LEGO’s marketing campaigns.

LEGO have recreated the first six Star Wars movie posters using their iconic minifigures and LEGO bricks.

LEGO created these designs for the 2015 Star Wars Celebration event that took place in Anaheim, California in April.

The posters also pay homage to the eagerly anticipated and upcoming film, Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens.

Which is your favourite poster?


Source: My Modern Met




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Typography good enough to eat

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Typography,

Wed, 20 May 2015

This sweet hand-lettering project uses real edible materials including ice cream, bubblegum and cotton candy.

Created by Alex Palazzi and Dani Raya, this is the first in Palazzi’s series of handcrafted lettering. The artists, based in Barcelona, Spain, carve out the typographic sculpture in clay before coating them with real food.

It really is typography that is good enough to eat.

Check out the project here and it also includes photographs of the making of the sculptures.


Source: Design Taxi




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Interactive packaging

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Packaging,

Tue, 19 May 2015

Interactive packaging is an awesome way to make your product more fun, more memorable, and sometimes even more useful. These interactive packages are more than just a clever picture – they let the consumer interact with their product in a way that gives it more value than just the product itself.

And let’s be honest, some of them are just really quite cool!

Some of these have actually been implemented, while other are simply design ideas.

See loads more interactive package designs or add your own at Bored Panda.


Source: Bored Panda




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Computer bugs

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Thu, 14 May 2015

I love these beautiful bugs made from recycled computer and electronics components. They were created for the project Computer Component Bugs by Julie Alice Chappell.

With all their tiny components, complex circuitry and bright metallic colours I cannot help but compare them to the detailed patterns we see when we look at nature up close.”Chappell wrote on Permaculture.


For Chappell the fact these bugs are environmentally friendly made is important. Her first batch of electronics came from the Beneficial Foundation (also known as “The Craft’s Bank”) in Portsmouth, which distributes electronic no longer wanted by companies to various art related groups. She also finds computers and electronics just discarded all over the place.


To see more of Chappell’s work please see her website.

Source: Demilked




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Drawing yourself into the frame

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Illustration,

Wed, 13 May 2015

I found this on Pinterest – it’s an oldie but, I think, a goodie. Is it a photography? Is it an illustration? Well, actually it’s both. Blows my mind a little bit.

UK-based digital artist Dan Lester combines photography and illustration into clever and intriguing images that really make you question what you're looking at.


The digital illustrator merges the roles of model and artist into one in his ‘Drawn On’ series.


See more of Lester’s work at his website. Check out his Biro portraits – so, so good.


Source: My Modern Met




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Cross your fingers

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding,

Thu, 07 May 2015

The National Lottery has had a refresh which sees the “crossed fingers” logo redesigned and updated and used as much as possible.

The crossed fingers logo has been in use since The National Lottery was introduced by Camelot in 1994 and was initially created by Saatch & Saatchi Design.


Wolff Olins has created a new identity for The National Lottery, which sees the brand’s “crossed fingers” identity updated and a new “Gamestore” brand introduced for Scratch cards and Instant Win Games.

The logo was updated by Landor in 2002, when it was reworked to look like a 3D image. The National Lottery says the crossed fingers identity is recognsied by 95 per cent of the UK adult population, and that the Wolff Olins rebrand will see it put “at the heart of every game logo”.


Camelot says the rebrand is the “next stage” of the strategy it has adopted over the last 18 months “to further underline our ‘Life Changing’ purpose”. It also says the new identity is “a natural evolution of the ‘Play Makes It Possible’ campaign”, which has been running since last summer. As part of rebrand, The National Lottery’s online Instant Win Games and Scratch cards will be brought together under the umbrella brand “GameStore” across both digital and retail channels.


I really like the people focused campaign materials and the colour scheme.  The new identity will start to roll out in mid-July so I will be looking out for it then.


Source: Design Week




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Ant sized advertising

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Marketing, Advertising,

Wed, 06 May 2015

We love a bit of Marvel in my house, very excited about the Age of Ultron (and it was released on my birthday) but equally thrilled that Ant-Man will be released this year.

So, I loved the brilliant teaser advertising campaign for up and coming Ant-Man film.


Spotted in Australia, tiny billboards promoting the Marvel film have been popping up on the streets, at bus stops and in parks.


These billboards are reportedly firmly attached to their locations and come complete with LED lights that turn on at night.


What a fun, themed marketing campaign. If you spot any popping up in the UK please let me know!


Source: Design Taxi




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The innocence of childhood

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography,

Tue, 05 May 2015

These photographs feel me with a warmth and joy as they show the simple fun and innocence of childhood.

Created by Adrian McDonald who is a wedding photographer by trade but is now finding fame by taking photographs of his neighbourhood children.

While in one photo a young boy looks completely caught in the moment playing with his toy dinosaurs, in another a boy smiles in awe of a bubble that he's just created in mid-air. I just love the look of wonderment his little face – adorable. McDonald came across his new subjects not far from where he lives; the children are actually part of a large family that lives right next door to him in the rural Jamaican parish of Westmoreland.

Five months ago, McDonald was taking photos of plants and animals outside his home when he heard the neighbors' kids playing on a swing in their backyard. The children seemed to be living in their own world, laughing and playing in total bliss. With their parents' permission, McDonald started photographing them at play.

To see more of McDonald’s work please see his website.


Source: My Modern Met




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Floating art

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Wed, 29 Apr 2015

33-year-old Patrick Kramer is the artist behind these two mesmerizing, hyper realistic paintings of women floating in mid-air.

In his first painting, called Gravity, a blond woman in a bright yellow dress lies in front of wallpaper made of skulls. A commissioned piece for a collector, Kramer liked the concept so much that he created Lifting the Shroud to complement the work. "In my mind, the floating signifies a different state of being, and gives the figures a dream-like quality that I find compelling," he told My Modern Met.

Kramer graduated from Brigham Young University with a degree in Studio Arts. The Springville, Utah-based artist says hyper realistic art suits his personality since he can "be a bit of a perfectionist and "a little OCD."

In addition to human figures, Kramer has a gift for painting photorealistic images of flowers, insects, and fish.


See more of Kramer’s work on his website.

Sources: My Modern Met




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Heartbreaking marketing

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Marketing,

Tue, 28 Apr 2015

Tinder users at the SXSW festival on Saturday were encountering an attractive 25-year-old woman named Ava on the dating app.


A journalist’s friend made a match with her, and soon they were having a conversation via text message.


But when he opened up Ava's Instagram, it became clear something was amiss. There was one photo and one video, both promoting Ex Machina, a sci-fi film that just happened to be premiering Saturday night. The link in her bio went to the film's website. And it turns out the woman in the photos is Swedish actress Alicia Vikander, who plays an artificial intelligence in the movie.


I think this is brilliant marketing the way it ties in with the movie. The questions she is asking are questions about a robot wanting to know what it’s like to be human. What do you think? Is it spammy or clever?

In this blog I have recently been featuring some great articles by Tim Nudd, a contributor and Creative Editor at Adweek. Check out his other articles here, pretty much all are worth a read. You can follow him on Twitter too.


Source: Yahoo! Movies, Adweek




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Optical illusions

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography, Digital,

Thu, 23 Apr 2015

I’m not going to lie, these images make me feel a little bit sick particularly as at first glance they look like normal photographs. But the optical illusions draw you in and soon your head starts to hurt!

Created by photographer and photoshopper Erik Johansson, the images are as beautiful as they effective. The colourful upside-down cars were commissioned by the Australian Traffic Accident Commission to show the dangers of driving while on drugs. Clever marketing.

It’s all the little details that you don’t notice at first. You need to keep looking at these mind-bending photos to see the clever touches; like the light plugged into the grass.

See more of Johansson’s work on his website.


Source: Demilked




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Spot the refresh

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding,

Wed, 22 Apr 2015

Music streaming service Spotify has undergone a global design refresh, with an array of colours now injected into the brand.


The new look has been designed by New York-based consultancy Collins, after Spotify approached them to undertake the project.


The new branding identity means Spotify sheds its “sedate” colors for a bold look that complements the lively music culture it advocates.

Collins has broadened the exclusively green and black palette to 31 colours, added more “duotone” – two colour – imagery and photographs, and used new typefaces to extend the “limited toolbox”.

The duotone concept has been applied to band name graphics and photography, also incorporating angles, to give the images a distinctive “Spotify” look.


The Spotify brand is being refreshed across the website, application, social media, events, and advertising and marketing collateral. They hope to market the company as an “entertainment brand”, rather than a “technology service”.


Sources: Design Taxi and Design Week




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Smithsonian photo comp

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Photography,

Tue, 21 Apr 2015

We love a photograph competition at Acumen Design so any excuse to show some fantastic taken shots is a winner with us. The finalists of the 12th Annual Smithsonian Photo Competition have just been announced.

The editors have selected ten photos from each of the following categories – Natural World, Travel, People, Americana, Altered Images and Mobile. Those will now compete in the arena of internet attention and gather votes up until March 30th. Then, winner of the Reader’s Choice will get a $500 cash prize, and will be announced alongside Grand Prize and Category winners.

The Smithsonian magazine was founded by former Life editors in cooperation with the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC, so it naturally has a sort of National Geographic vibe.

Which one is your favourite?


Read more about the competition here.

Source: Demilked




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Portal to another world

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Thu, 16 Apr 2015

These street art murals are brightening city streets with rainbow colours and gradients that make viewers feel like they’re seeing through walls.

Artist 1010 is an anonymous, Germany-based graffiti artist and uses just spray paint to tunnel through walls with his 3D illusions. His latest masterpieces include a gallery show in San Francisco and the walls in Panama City.

The masterfully shaded colour bands make us feel like we are entering a never-ending portal to a new colourful world. The Panama City edition includes fun, spring-themed colors, which deviate from the artist’s preference for darker, bolder hues.


See more on 1010’s Facebook page.

Source: My Modern Met




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Facebook gets friendlier

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Marketing, Advertising,

Wed, 15 Apr 2015

Banks did it, IT and tech firms did it, now social media is marketing and advertising itself on the people. Since it is social media you would have thought this pretty obvious but it has been lacking.

Facebook have unveiled an advertising campaign that centers around friendship and the bonds that tie people together. As well as TV adverts they have adverts in print, digital, Facebook, Instagram and outdoor billboards formats.


Adweek recently got an exclusive look at the billboards—the simple and striking designs featuring photographs of friends emblazoned with a check mark got the thumbs up. A small Facebook icon is the only branding, again showing the company's newfound confidence as an advertiser. (It's an iconic brand by now, and is finally acting like one.)


The digital experience is interesting, too. The site, friends.fb.co, includes all sorts of clickable content—leading to quirky little videos and photos, all of which are sharable on Facebook with a click. Melodie McDaniel shot the stills and live action.

See more at Adweek for all the information and more images.


I was actually drawn to one of the Facebook TV advert when I was watching a programme and thought it was fun, true to life and it made me watch it. Very clever.


The writing in the advert is poetic and somewhat humble. The self-effacing tone is a thread that runs through the whole campaign. It also cleverly weaves in familiar Facebook slogans such as ‘likes’, ‘shares’ and ‘friend requests’.

Source: Design Taxi, Adweek




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Coca-Cola consistency

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding, Marketing, Packaging,

Tue, 14 Apr 2015

Coca-Cola is changing the packaging across all its flavors — the original, Diet Coke, Coke Zero, Coca-Cola Cherry, Coca-Cola Vanilla, and the recently launched mid-calorie range Coke Life — so that they all look pretty much the same, aside from the different colours.

Coke says in a press release that the packaging transformation moves it to a "one brand" strategy across Great Britain, Ireland, France, Belgium, the Nordics, Holland, and Spain. Rather than marketing each brand separately, the entire range will be advertised as one.


This also highlights how confusing Coke think its brand extensions have become and shows us a lesson in brand consistency. No matter how big your brand sometimes you need to rein in all the sub brands and reassess your brand consistency.

Consumers will be able to identify the drinks they want by the iconic colors of the variants of Coca-Cola, along with a description seen at the base of the cans and bottles. The ingredients and tastes of the drinks will remain the same.


Coca-Cola says the new packaging designs will also feature “clearer descriptors to highlight the benefits of each Coca-Cola – for example, ‘zero sugar, zero calories’.”

The new packaging will also feature the UK Government’s front-of-pack nutritional labelling scheme.

Coca-Cola says the new “one brand” strategy has come about because “not all British consumers fully understand the choice offered within the Coca-Cola trademark”.

The brand says this new strategy will also be used in its advertising, with future Coca-Cola advertising set to feature the full range of Coca-Cola variants and low- and no-sugar Coca-Cola products appearing in the final frames of all television advertising.


Sources: Design Taxi, Design Week, Business Insider




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Candy land

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Wed, 08 Apr 2015

These installments are Wreck-It Ralph bought to life –  I love them, and kind of want to lick them, is that too weird? Makes my teeth ache just looking at it.

This crazy, colourful saccharine art are created by Tanya Schultz, of Pip & Pop. Sweets, sugars and candies are used alongside toys and masking tape. But it is the sugar hills that give the greatest effect to the installations, alongside the sickly psychedelic joyride of all the colours of the rainbow.

See more about Pip and Pop on their website.


Source: Demilked




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Liquid type

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Illustration, Typography,

Tue, 07 Apr 2015

Cambridge-based illustrator Lex Wilson has created a new series of three-dimensional typography.

Playing with optical illusion, his illustrations feature liquid spills in letters that seem to be hollowed out from the surface of the paper on which they are drawn.

Other more complex works include letters that are formed by stairs, and rendering letters in the shape of a skateboarding half-pipe ramp.

Check out his Facebook page for more creative pieces.

For me the ‘How Crude’ illustration is the best work as it features a (crude) oil can pouring into the lettering – very clever play on words.


Source: Design Taxi




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Seeing through touch

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Digital,

Thu, 02 Apr 2015

Mostly if you touch a priceless artwork in a museum or gallery you can expect warning sirens and being tackle to the ground by a burly security guard. This is not the case in an ongoing exhibition Hoy toca el Prado (Touching the Prado).


On display at the Museo del Prado in Madrid through to June 28, the special show features six replicas of famous paintings designed to be touched and appreciated by the blind and visually impaired in order to provide them with a tactile connection to the world of visual art.


This amazing accomplishment is down to the extensive work of printing studio Estudios Durero and their advanced relief printing technique called "Didú." they start with a high-resolution photo of the original image. Then they select the most suitable textures and volumes to guide the visitor's hands, making sure to pay attention to every last detail in order to best understand the composition and theme of each artwork. Through a 40-hour process, the volumes and textures of the painting are defined and printed with special ink. Then the canvas undergoes a chemical treatment to give volume to initially flat surfaces. Finally, the real image—with the original colours—is printed on top, resulting in a relief-style reproduction that can be explored by touch.


Thanks to Estudios Durero and their technique Didú, people without sight can enjoy the rare opportunity to "see" the works of masters like Leonardo Da Vinci, Francisco Goya, and El Greco using their hands.


To read more about Estudios Durero’s work please see their website.

Source: My Modern Met




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Unbranded Agender

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Branding, Marketing,

Wed, 01 Apr 2015

This is an interesting concept: Selfridges has worked on the design of a “gender neutral” retail space.

The three-floor “Agender” experiment has been designed for the Oxford Street sore in collaboration with furniture designer Faye Toogood. The clothing ranges it features will also be available at the Birmingham and Manchester stores.


At the Oxford street store manikins have been done away with in shop windows, “genderless” sculptures designed by Toogood populate the retail space inside and garments are concealed within covers.

Selfridges is launching 5 unisex collections and has selected an additional 40 brands which can be worn by any sex.

At Selfridges.com the theme is continued with male and female models wearing the garments: see the website here. The website claims that “…we celebrate fashion without definition”. There’s even an Agender music video featuring an exclusive sound track by Devonté Hynes and Neneh Cherry.


The brand has put a lot of work and creativity into this unbranded gender-neutral concept.

In the Oxford Street store there are two defined areas conceived as a “house” with genderless abstract objects featured within.


Concrete, horsehair and rubber have been used within the houses as they have a “raw, primal feel” according to Toogood who wanted to “pare back the superficial layers of polish and branding”.

Although the space is de-branded, the Selfridges in-house team has worked on 2D graphics which includes the “Agender” logo and the “He She Me” posters.


Source: Design Week




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Snap happy

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Advertising, Photography,

Thu, 26 Mar 2015

Apple have changed their advertising strategy with new poster campaign – they aim to show how amazing the iPhone 6 is for taking photographs.

Apple is rolling out a new global advertising campaign that shows off the incredible photos and videos that are taken on an iPhone 6 every day. Billboards around the world, 70 cities in 24 countries, will feature photos captured by iPhone 6 users. A total of 77 iPhone photographers will have their photos featured in this campaign. Apple whittled down their favorites from tens of thousands of photos published on the Web. Just to be clear, these were not commissioned images; they were actually found by Apple on the Internet.

On their website, Apple shows us which photos they've selected and gives us the reason why each photo was chosen. Here are a selection of the chosen images.


See more at Apple’s World Gallery.

This is an interesting advertising campaign and would certainly attract people’s attention, it’s also much less techy and more people focused, something phone (and car) companies are buying into at the moment.

Source: My Modern Met




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Stand out typography

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Typography,

Tue, 24 Mar 2015

You’ve seen typography and you’ve seen 3D illustrations – now its time to put those two together.

Berlin, Geneva and Vancouver-based artist Cyril Vouilloz, aka RYLSEE, creates amusingly interactive 3D typography. As he writes himself, he is “obsessed with words and hand-drawn type compositions.”

With these amusing letters, the artist makes it seem as though you could pull, bend, squeeze and otherwise interact with them in any way you wish.


See more of RYLSEE’s work on his website.

Source: Demilked




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Mixing it up

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Advertising,

Thu, 19 Mar 2015

I like a brand that can laugh at itself and have fun with its image and this IKEA print advert does just that.

If you’ve ever owned a piece of IKEA furniture, you’ll know that they can be surprisingly tricky to assemble even with the instructions provided. 



To illustrate this fact, the Swedish furniture brand has unveiled billboards that playfully poke fun at its self-assembly products. 


Dubbed ‘Assembly Fail’, the billboards feature jumbled posters advertising its assembly service with the tagline “Our assembly service is happy to help.”


They were created by Hamburg-based agency thjnk.


Source: Design Taxi




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All natural

Posted by: Jo Briton

Categories: Creative,

Wed, 18 Mar 2015

Since 1972, Bavarian artist Nils-Udo has worked directly with nature to create stunning, site-specific works of art that celebrate the beauty of the land.

Nils-Udo turned from painting nature to creating site-specific pieces using natural materials.


The artist works on site using found berries, leaves, branches, and blossoms are transformed into captivating pieces evocative of mysterious portals and dreamy fairy realms deep in the woods. From a delicately arranged scattering of petals on the surface of a pond, to spectacular nests formed of twigs, leaves, and wildflowers, each ephemeral intervention is a reflection of nature in its most essential state.

The works of art are as beautiful and the ingredients natural.

See more of Nils-Udo’s work on this website.


Source: My Modern Met




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